ART APPRECIATION WEEKENDS 2019

 

1st - 3rd MARCH 2019 & 1st -3rd november 2019 - Stanley Spencer, Gwen John, david jones

 

designed to increase your enjoyment of art in a relaxed and informal setting.

There is time during the illustrated talks for questions and discussion.

Your tutor Jeremy Carlisle BA (Hons) MA is a practising artist and art historian.

Join us here in the pretty harbour town of Kirkcudbright, known nationally as “The Artists Town”.

March and November 2019 

May Tree, Cookham 1945 Stanley Spencer

May Tree, Cookham 1945 Stanley Spencer

For our 2019 courses we will be looking at Stanley Spencer, Gwen John and David Jones.

March 1st - 3rd 2019  &  November 1st - 3rd 2019

The Selkirk art appreciation weekends are designed to increase your enjoyment of art in a relaxed and informal setting. There is time during the illustrated talks for questions and discussion. Your tutor Jeremy Carlisle BA (Hons) MA is a practising artist and art historian.

Stanley Spencer 1891 – 1959   Stanley Spencer was unique. He was nicknamed ‘Cookham’ by his fellow students at the Slade in recognition of his passionate attachment to the village of his birth. He was hugely gifted as a naturalistic painter but valued his ‘up-in-heaven’ visionary, imaginative work more highly than his portraits and landscapes. We will consider his masterpieces in both these areas of his work.

Gwen John 1879 – 1939   Her output as an artist was small however her gift to us was a body of work that is profound in its realisation of light and meditative calm.  She had an unhappy childhood and followed her brother Augustus John to the Slade as soon as she was able to leave home. She established herself as an independent artist in Paris at the beginning of the 20C and had contact with the leading artists of the day. There she evolved a style of painting that was original and uncompromising.

David Jones 1895 – 1974   Jones has been compared to William Blake. They were both painter-poets who retained into adulthood an unusually direct link to the imaginations of their childhoods.  His epic prose-poem ‘In Parenthesis’ is one of the great accounts of the First World War. Published in 1936 it won the Hawthornden Prize for literature in 1937. He painted predominantly in watercolours and their style reflects his belief that all life is sacramental. At their best they are celebratory and full of luminosity. 

Arrangements

Friday

Arrive in your own time on Friday afternoon

6pm - Meet your hosts and lecturer Jeremy Carlisle for pre-dinner drinks and canapés at in the Burns Room.

6.30pm   Illustrated introductory talk to the weekend

7.30pm – 3 course dinner

Saturday

7.15am – 9.15am    Breakfast in your own time

9.30am                   illustrated talk

11.00am approx    coffee & shortbread in Bistro area

11.30am approx    illustrated talk

1.00pm                   soup and sandwich lunch Free time to explore Kirkcudbright’s galleries, shops etc.

6.30pm meet for pre-dinner drinks and canapés in the Burns Room

7.00pm                  illustrated talk

8.00pm                  3 course dinner

Sunday

 8.15am – 9.15am   Breakfast in your own time

9.30am                 illustrated talk

11.00am                coffee & shortbread in the Bistro

11.30am                illustrated talk

1.00pm                 soup and sandwich lunch Goodbyes and  departures


Price

 £259.00 per person

includes Dinner Bed and Breakfast, welcome drink & canapés, coffee breaks, soup and sandwich lunches.

To find out more about Jeremy Carlisle visit his website  www.jeremycarlisle.co.uk

 

Kirkcudbright's artists colony

The story of its artists’ colony is full of examples of artists arriving on a summer painting visit and staying on for the rest of their lives. The reasons why Kirkcudbright attracted so many painters and became an artists’ colony are not difficult to discern. It was, and remains, perhaps the most attractive small town in Scotland with impressive architecture.

There is the High Street with its ancient Tollbooth and the 18th century town houses enlivened by their variously and sometimes eccentrically painted frontages, the myriad colours giving the street an exotic, almost continental, atmosphere. Between the houses are cobbled, crooked wynds, many of which contain artist’s and craftsmen’s studios. McLellan’s Castle an imposing sixteenth century ruin in the middle of the town, dominates the skyline.

When E.A.Taylor asked Hornel why he thought Kirkcudbright was so popular with artists he said, “Well, it’s a fine old town and not too big, but big enough to keep you from vegetating.